Weekly News: Chinese Dalai Lama Censorship and the New Muslim-American Ms. Marvel

 

The following was written for the ongoing “weekly news” section of The Aquarius Paradigm Weekly Newsletter, which is being offered for $11.11 a month. Income from the newsletter helps my family and I get by, and the option to subscribe will be given below.

Hello dear friends, and welcome to the sixty-eighth issue of The Aquarius Paradigm Weekly Newsletter.

This week, I’ll discuss China’s announced desire to censor Tibetans’ access to the Dalai Lama’s material and Marvel Comics’ newest “Ms. Marvel” – a teenage Muslim-American girl living with her family in New Jersey who gains superpowers.

We’ll also absorb an update from our Universal Family; we’ll begin a discussion of the industrial and societal benefits of hemp during this week’s planetary healing; and I’ll answer a reader’s question about the “Light language” phenomenon.

To begin for this week – China has announced a vow to censor Tibetans’ access to material from the Dalai Lama in an effort to crack down on the awareness his words have and continue to breed in Tibet. (1)

The Dalai Lama, who fled Tibet in 1959 and who’s won the Nobel Peace Prize for his work, stands as a voice of spiritual truth and liberation and it’s the potential for Tibetans to arise and proclaim their independence because of listening to him that China is clearly afraid of.

I’ll post the usual snippets from the referenced news story that discuss this announced crackdown/censorship.

“China is vowing to silence the voice of exiled spiritual leader the Dalai Lama in his homeland Tibet by tightening media controls to ensure his ‘propaganda’ is not accessed by anyone on the internet, television or by any other means, a top official has announced.

China calls the Nobel Peace Prize-winning Dalai Lama a ‘wolf in sheep’s clothing’ and claim he seeks to use violent methods to establish an independent Tibet.

The Dalai Lama, who fled to India after a failed uprising in 1959, says he simply wants Tibet to achieve genuine autonomy.

China has long tried to prevent Tibetans from listening to or watching programmes broadcast from outside the country, or gathering any information about the Dalai Lama and the exiled government online.” (1)

The Dalai Lama is claimed by China to be an instrument of propaganda who seeks violence to establish independence in Tibet, and the referenced article mentions China’s rigorous defense of their Tibetan rule.

Knowing as much about the Dalai Lama as anyone else, I can say this his voice can and likely has played a significant role in motivating Tibetans into understanding the importance of establishing their independence and freedom in peace instead of violence.

The referenced article also mentions that Tibetans have been protesting more lately and that the protests have led to crackdowns.

Despite this and the fact that China is proudly announcing censorship of the material their citizens are able to access, as well as further internet surveillance, they still use their own propaganda to justify their censorship of material that breeds dissent against them.

Painting the Dalai Lama as a propagandist who wants to incite violence in Tibet provides China the slightest reason (as if they needed one) to exert further control over Tibetans, who are increasingly awakening and arising with the intent of proclaiming and establishing their independence.

To get a clearer view of his apparent malevolence, let’s take a look at some of the things this so-called propaganda instrument, the Dalai Lama, has said.

Brainyquote.com gives us a great list of different quotes from the Dalai Lama, some of which I’ll post here.

“Our prime purpose in this life is to help others. And if you can’t help them, at least don’t hurt them.”

“This is my simple religion. There is no need for temples; no need for complicated philosophy. Our own brain, our own heart is our temple; the philosophy is kindness.”

“Love and compassion are necessities, not luxuries. Without them humanity cannot survive.”

“It is very important to generate a good attitude, a good heart, as much as possible. From this, happiness in both the short term and the long term for both yourself and others will come.” (2)

I could post a lot more quotes from this conscious peacemaker, and they all drive home the same point that he isn’t the boogeyman China’s painting him as to justify further control over Tibet.

Oppressive and controlling regimes will be a thing of the past in a new paradigm Created by and for the people, and try as they might, China can’t and won’t stop the uprising of Tibetans.

The Dalai Lama speaks of Love; harmony; compassion; forgiveness; peace; a collection of Divine qualities that point people toward peaceful ways of solving our problems instead of violent ways, and despite any justification that can be given, it’s clear that China is taking greater means to limit Tibetans’ freedom and access to revolution-inciting material.

This shows that they’re sweating in the face of protests and challenges of their rule over Tibet, and it’ll be interesting to see how a revolution of the Tibetan people comes about despite China’s futile attempts to squash it.

The people are rising up in every country and proclaiming our sovereignty from the rule of governments who’d tell us how to Live our Lives forever if allowed, and this move from China could perhaps be seen as positive in that it shows that Tibetans are progressing in making their desire for independence known with the help of the Dalai Lama.

In other news – Marvel Comics is introducing a Muslim-American superhero, the new Ms. Marvel, in what seems to be a recognition of the diversity of these changing times. (3)

16 year old Kamala Khan will be introduced as a superhero with the ability to change shape who experiences Life as a Muslim-American in New Jersey.

I’ll post a snippet from the referenced news source that explains the character of Kamala a bit more.

“Move over Black Widow and step aside She-Hulk: Marvel Comics is introducing a new superhero – a 16-year-old Muslim-American girl named Kamala Khan, to reflect the growing diversity of its readers.

The character, who will be the new Ms. Marvel, lives with her conservative Pakistani parents and brother in the US state of New Jersey. She will make her debut in January and appear in a monthly series starting on February 6.

‘It is so important that we tell stories that reflect the ever-changing world that we live in and being a Muslim-American is so much a part of that,’ said Sana Amanat, the series editor, who also worked on the Ultimate Spider-Man and Ultimate X-Men comic books.” (3)

The referenced source then goes deeper into what Kamala’s story is intended to be about.

“Although the inspiration for the new series came from a desire to explore the Muslim-American experience, [Amanat] said it isn’t about what it means to be a Muslim, Pakistani or American.

‘It is about a young girl who is figuring out who she is and what happens when these really extraordinary things happen to her,’ she added in an interview.

Khan is a big comic book fan and after she discovers her superhuman power – being a polymorph and able to lengthen her arms and legs and change her shape – she takes on the name of Ms. Marvel. The title had previously belonged to Carol Danvers, a character Khan had always had admired.” (3)

In my opinion, it’s great to see this validation of the cultural shift taking place in western society. People are awakening to the reality that there is no separation between us, and as diversity floods the US like it never has before, Americans’ tolerance for others will be increasingly tested.

Even though the United States has been a hub of activity for forces who’ve worked to keep the world under their control, the assumption that all Americans are blind to this or other truths isn’t necessarily correct. Americans have become increasingly more tolerant and aware, in my opinion, and I don’t think the narrow-mindedness that affects a small portion of our population should be attributed to everybody.

In a progressive society, diversity is welcomed as it’s recognized that we all have a crucial part to play – every race and every person. We can take our society in a positive direction if we can learn to embrace each other and hear each other out, and this comic book could perhaps dip into the adversity that can be experienced being Muslim in America.

Like many others, I’m of the belief that Muslims have been demonized in the US because of 9/11 and that benevolent people have been linked to violence and destruction simply because of the color of their skin and/or their religion.

One of the great things about this new character, in my view, is that its creators are borrowing from an archetype that could very easily be painted as a villain in the US and giving it the status of a hero. That alone affirms what the growing number of conscious Americans have long felt: that the hatred propagated against Muslims doesn’t have to stop us from accepting them in our society.

Comic books provide a good outlet for this message, because they influence a lot of people and stand as a significant voice in our culture. Reflecting the growing acceptance of Muslims helps a lot of people who’ve long been tired of our unenlightened society to see that progress is being made.

This week’s news links:

(1)- “Chinese Government Vows to Stamp Out the Voice of the Dalai Lama in Tibet” (Written by Heather Saul for the Independent) at:

http://goldenageofgaia.com/2013/11/chinese-government-vows-to-stamp-out-the-voice-of-the-dalai-lama-in-tibet/

(2)- BrainyQuote.com – “Dalai Lama Quotes” at:

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/authors/d/dalai_lama.html

(3)- “Marvel Comics Debuts Female Muslim Superhero” (From Al-Jazeera) at:

 http://goldenageofgaia.com/2013/11/marvel-comics-debuts-female-muslim-superhero/

Image: http://intentblog.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/the_dalai_lama.jpg

This concludes our weekly news.

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